School Texts

f. 1r: initial with phytomorphic motives

Valerius Maximus, Factorum et dictorum memorabilium libri IX

  • 1381, Bologna; parchment; mm 263 × 185; ff. I, 9 + 102, I’.
  • Vatican City, ‘Biblioteca Apostolica Vaticana’, Vat. lat. 1918

A manuscript by Valerius Maximus copied by a ‘migrant’ Friulian student, Giovanni of quondam Andrea of Gemona, who was in Bologna to study law or ars notariae.

Seneca, Tragoediae

  • 1399, [Cividale]; parchment; 290 × 215; ff. 228.
  • Oxford, Bodleian Library, Canon. Class. lat. 88

This codex, written in the schools of Cividale towards the end of the end of the fourteenth century, is a significant witness of Seneca’s work circulation in Friuli.

f. 2r, in the bottom Giordano Orsini’s coat of arms

Statius, Thebais

  • 1402; parchment; mm 352 × 234; ff. I, 168, II’.
  • Vatican City, ‘Biblioteca Apostolica Vaticana’, Arch. Cap. S. Pietro H. 15

Not only a study text, but also, and above all, a pomp display is to be considered this magnificent witness of Statius’ Thebais, copied in Bologna by the Friulian student Giovanni Berto on a good-quality white parchment, with wide borders and a very rich decoration.

f. 1r, incipit of the Notabilia

Giovanni da Soncino, Notabilia in grammaticam

  • S. XIV-XV; parchment; mm 277 × 202; ff. I, 30, I’.
  • San Daniele del Friuli, ‘Biblioteca Civica Guarneriana’, 129

This school, better say secondary school, text is likely to be referred to Guarnerio’s education or somehow to his relations with his school teacher, the humanist Giovanni da Spilimbergo (1380 circa-1455), as evidenced by the frequent marginal and interlinear notes of a contemporary or little later period.

f. 3r, Leonardo Bruni’s Prologue to Basil the Great’s homily

Miscellaneous Humanistic Texts

  • S. XV2; parchment; mm 158 × 99; ff. II, 74, II’.
  • Udine, ‘Biblioteca Arcivescovile’, ms. 11

The codex, manufactured under the family Porcia’s patronage, includes only texts legitimating those humanistic culture and studia humanitatis that had a significantly wide spread in Friuli.

f. 1r, Juvenal’s Satires incipit

Juvenal, Saturarum libri V; Persius, Saturarum liber

  • S. XV med.; parchment; mm 233 x 147; ff. IV, 86, III’.
  • Udine, ‘Biblioteca Arcivescovile’, 14

A manuscript designed and manufactured as a school text to be studied at Udine, perhaps initially for the personal use of Valerio Filittini, the undersigning copyist upon his work’s completion.

f. 184r, page of the Miscellanea with Luigi Belgrado’s subscription

Miscellaneous Humanistic and School Texts

  • S. XV; paper; mm 208 × 142; ff. VI, 227, VII’.
  • San Daniele del Friuli, ‘Biblioteca Civica Guarneriana’, 228

A book addressed to the practical use of students and schoolboys more than to the learned lectures of a humanist, this codex is however a precious witness of the cultural ferment and the wide spread of the studia humanitatis in the fifteenth-century Friuli thanks to the school system.

ff. 1r and 124r

Miscellaneous Commentaries to minores auctores

  • S. XIV and XV (1414, 1415, 1416); paper; mm 297 × 220; ff. I, 210, I’.
  • Treviso City Library, 156

A school text that should owe its manufacturing, according to a widely evidenced praxis, to a Friulian university student, Francesco Squarani of Venzone, who attended the ars notariae studies at Padua.

f. 1r, initial with gilded foliage phytomorphic motives

Alexander of Villedieu, Doctrinale

  • A. 1423; parchment; mm 306 x 205; ff. III, 54, II’.
  • San Daniele del Friuli, ‘Biblioteca Civica Guarneriana’, 120

One of the most used texts for Latin teaching in the grammar schools all over Europe until the sixteenth century which got into Guarnerio d’Artegna’s book collection.

f. 22v, initial in red, with pen-made filigree, and elegant friezes extending along the borders

Boethius, De consolatione philosophiae

  • 1461; paper; mm 288 × 214; ff. II, 40, II’.
  • San Daniele del Friuli, ‘Biblioteca Civica Guarneriana’, 125

The codex was copied by an anonymous scribe, most likely a student who attended in Gemona the schools of master Nicolò di Iacopo of San Daniele.

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