Peter Lombard, Sententiae (Guarner. 42)

  • S. XII2; parchment; mm 290 × 195; ff. 256
  • San Daniele del Friuli, ‘Biblioteca Civica Guarneriana’, 42

Peter Lombard’s work became the official textbook of scholastic theology teaching. This codex, written upon cardinal Ardizzone da Rivoltella’s patronage, later belonged to Antonio Pancera, patriarch of Aquileia.

The Sentences, written by Peter Lombard in the years 1150-1152, became the official textbook of scholastic theology teaching after the Lateran Council (1215). The codex kept at the Guarneriana library, probably written in Bologna around the eighth decade of the eleventh century, shows a number of decorated initials with endings enriched by phyto- and zoomorphic motives. Fancy patterns, mostly drawn in red, blue and green, point out notabilia on the margins; flowering and animal motives, human or devil faces, everyday-use objects time after time either highlight the text or are simply used as border decoration. As examples thereof you can see a goat playing a cither (f. 128v), a skewerful (f. 113v), an oddly masked hunter (f. 228r), a tumbler (ff. 115r, 122r, 151v), a cook offering a fish on the skew on a tray (f. 125r). The patron of the manuscript was the cardinal Ardizzone da Rivoltella (1153-1182 circa), portrayed on f. 256r while receiving the codex from the hands of the copyist on his knees before him. Towards the end of the fourteenth century Antonio Pancera, patriarch of Aquileia, came by this book he later was to give to Guarnerio dArtegna.

 f. 256r, the patron cardinal Ardizzone da Rivoltella receives the codex by the scriptor

f. 256r, the patron cardinal Ardizzone da Rivoltella receives the codex by the scriptor

 f. 150r, border decorations that highlight notabilia (detail)

f. 150r, border decorations that highlight notabilia (detail)

 f. 4r, initial C with phyto- and zoomorphic motives

f. 4r, initial C with phyto- and zoomorphic motives

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