Liturgical Music Books

f. 9r, Mass of the 1st Advent Sunday

Gradual of Moggio

  • 1216 ca.; parchment; mm 283 × 191; ff. I, 153, I’. Square notation on tetragram.
  • Oxford, Bodleian Library, Canon. Lit. 340 (Madan 19426)

Quite certainly written at Admont Abbey, one of the main centres of the twelfth-century Benedictine monastic reformation, the manuscript very early was employed in the Friulian monastery of San Gallo, at Moggio.

f. 6r, Invitatory and antiphon prior to psalms 1-4

Breviary of Cividale

  • S. XII ex.-XIII in.; parchment; mm 395 × 255; 2 columns; ff. 422. Neumatic notation.
  • Cividale del Friuli, National Archaeological Museum. Archives and Library, codex XCI

Quite certainly written for the chapter of Cividale, this book betrays a strong Germanic imprint both due to the presence of transalpine saints and to the music notation.

Folium 101r

Aquileian Gradual

  • S. XIII; parchment; mm 165 × 108; ff. V, 257, V’. Square notation on red tetragram.
  • Vatican City, ‘Biblioteca Apostolica Vaticana’, Ross. 76 (former VIII 18)

The Aquileian provenance of the manuscript is widely documented by a series of Aquileian-typical liturgical constants and by the presence of the patron saints Hermagoras and Fortunatus.

f. 149r, final section of Hallelujah Tu es vas electionis (St. Paul) and trop Hodie cantandus est introducing the 3rd Christmas Mass introit Puer natus

Aquileian Gradual

  • S. XIII; parchment; mm 180 × 125; ff. 191, Square notation on red tetragram.
  • Udine, ‘Biblioteca Arcivescovile’, 2 (former Oct. 2)

The sequence for Saints Hermagoras’ and Fortunatus’ mass, Plebs fidelis Hermachorae, is an unmistakable sign of the manuscript’s Aquileian provenance.

f. 30r,Christmas responsory Descendit de caelo with verse and trop (prosula)

Antiphonal of Cividale

  • S. XIII-XIV; parchment; mm 510 × 355; ff. II, 156 (172), I’. Square notation on red pentagram.
  • Cividale del Friuli, National Archaeological Museum. Archives and Library, codex XLI

The codex, which is seriously mutilated, was written for the Church of Cividale and evidences how complex were the relations between the different liturgical-music centres along the Middle Ages.

f. 130r, Easter chant Cum rex gloriae

Gradual of Cividale

  • S. XIII (post 1291) – XIV; parchment; mm 360 × 250; ff. I, 348, I’. Square notation on red tetragram.
  • Cividale del Friuli, National Archaeological Museum. Archives and Library, codex LVI

Written for the Church of Cividale, whose dedication day is here recalled, the codex witnesses the Germanic tradition impact on the Friulian area melodies.

f. 1r, antiphon Asperges for the aspersion and the processional antiphon Ecce karissimi dies illa

Processional of Cividale

  • S. XV2; parchment; mm 250 × 185; ff. I (paper), 93, I’ (paper). Square notation on a red tetragram.
  • Cividale del Friuli, National Archaeological Museum. Archives and Library, codex CI

For more than one century the processionals of Cividale have drawn the attention of musicologists and historians of the theatre. The main interest on an international level concerns some ‘dramatic’ compositions of a strong theatrical value.

f. 32r, beginning strophe of the hymn Dies absoluti praetereunt (Septuagesima)

Hymnal of Moggio

  • S. XIV; parchment; mm 280 × 190; ff. I, 83, I’. Square notation on red tetragram.
  • Udine, ‘Biblioteca Arcivescovile’, 80 (F.21.III.6)

This hymnal mainly exhibits the transalpine hymnody tradition enriched by local contributions.

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