Francesco Petrarca, Rerum vulgarium fragmenta (ff. 10r-105v, 107v-148r); Triumphi (ff. 150r-187r)

  • S.XV (last two decades, ante 1497); parchment; mm 236 × 148; ff. I, 189; ill. (2 miniature, 6 historiated, one inhabited initial)
  • San Daniele del Friuli, ‘Biblioteca Civica Guarneriana’, 139

The codex, written and illuminated by Bartolomeo Sanvito for the cleric Ludovico Agnelli of Mantua, belonged to the family Amalteo of Pordenone before being purchased by the Community of San Daniele del Friuli.

Like the previous one, this codex is also due to Bartolomeo Sanvito’s mastery as an amanuensis and illuminator, but it is to be dated to the last phase of his career, in Padua. The most recent dating proposals assign the manuscript to the ’80s or ’90s of the fifteenth century, in any case before the year 1497: the repeatedly drawn candelabrum friezes with the coats of arms identifying the patronage of the cleric Ludovico Agnelli of Mantua who serviced pope Sixtus IV and the cardinal Federico Gonzaga is surmounted by a black hat with three orders of tassels, without the mitre and the crosier Agnelli would only deserve since October 16th, 1497, when he was appointed archbishop of Cosenza by pope Alexander VI. The first part of the Rerum vulgarium fragmenta, paged in a single column, is opened by the initial V with laureate Petrarch’s face portrait (f. 10r). The passage to the second part is opened, as an emblem of life caducity, by the image of Laura in balance on Phaethon’s chariot (f. 150r), this latter systematically reminding of the other chariots drawn in the opening of the various Triumphs. The codex was owned by some members of the family Amalteo of Pordenone: Alvise, then his son Gregorio, who left it to his cousin Bartolomeo in his last will in 1629. Later it was purchased by the Community of San Daniele in 1747.

f. 107v, opening page of the section of rhymes ‘upon the death’ of Laura, portrayed while falling from a biga: the broken column on the miniature foreground is also an allegorical recollection of late Giovanni Colonna, Petrarch’s friend and patron

f. 107v, opening page of the section of rhymes ‘upon the death’ of Laura, portrayed while falling from a biga: the broken column on the miniature foreground is also an allegorical recollection of late Giovanni Colonna, Petrarch’s friend and patron

ff. 9v-10r, beginning of Petrarch’s Canzoniere conceived by Bartolomeo Sanvito, with a celebrative cippus on the front flyleaf and ornamented polychrome title with a candelabrum, the poet’s portrait and the patron’s coats of arm

ff. 9v-10r, beginning of Petrarch’s Canzoniere conceived by Bartolomeo Sanvito, with a celebrative cippus on the front flyleaf and ornamented polychrome title with a candelabrum, the poet’s portrait and the patron’s coats of arm

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